Dedicated to the safe observation of the
A Total Solar Eclipse is Coming to the United States!
Your use of this site is contingent on your understanding and agreement that you have read this link, you agree with its contents, and you will comply with all the rules of common sense and well established protocols for eye safety when observing any solar phenomenon.
"...And we'll see YOU... in the shadow!!"

Did you order glasses from us? Are you worried about the big recall?
How do you know the glasses you got from us were safe to use?

Eclipse2017.org is on the American Astronomical Society's approved vendor list for eclipse glasses!

Also, please read the blog post we wrote about the safety of glasses ordered from Eclipse2017.org!


Latest News

EYE SAFETY!

The most important information on this site!


LOOKING FOR THE INSTRUCTIONS?


The following pages (as well as the instructions printed on the glasses) make up the complete set of instructions you need to follow, in order to use Eclipse2017.org's eclipse glasses:



Direct link to the
Instruction sheet PDF
(Include this sheet, or a link to it, with
any glasses you provide to others)


The American Astronomical Society has issued many great resources for reading about eye safety!

Eclipse2017.org recommends all this great info as a MUST-READ for your eclipse viewing preparations!

Links from the AAS!
  How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely!
  Projection: Pinhole & Optical
  General Eye Safety
  Solar Eclipse safety flyer and tons of great resources
  (Direct links to one-page PDF instruction sheets:)
  Eclipse viewing instruction sheet provided by the AAS
  Eclipse viewing instruction sheet provided by NASA
The safety information in the links above has been endorsed by the American Astronomical Society, the American Academy of Ophthalmology, NASA, the American Academy of Optometry, and the National Science Foundation.

UPDATE: Reports have surfaced about FAKE eclipse glasses!



Your eyes are important, and so is this message. It should not scare you away from viewing the eclipse, but it should scare you enough that you take all proper precautions in protecting your eyes, and the eyes of those for whom you have direct responsibility, from the Sun!

Get Your SAFE solar viewing glasses for the eclipse!

By clicking the above link, you agree to read, understand and follow all Instructions regarding the use of the Solar Viewers in their entirety.

Every statement and recommendation on this site regarding viewing the eclipse is understood to contain the caveat that proper precautions regarding eye safety will have been taken by the observer, and that it is the observer's full responsibility to ensure that at all times while any part of the sun's photosphere (bright disk) is visible, will they observe it directly ONLY with suitable protective equipment, obtainable from eclipse2017.org and reputable third parties also noted on this site.

Eclipse2017.org considers eye safety to be one of the most important aspects of successfully viewing a total eclipse, and understands the massive amount of misinformation that is out there regarding this critical subject. We also understand that governmental agencies, schools, and professional organizations universally adopt the most conservative approach possible when advising the public - namely, never to look at the Sun, ever, under any circumstances, with any type of device, no matter what. Reconciling that with the absolute fact that every day, solar astronomers successfully point their equipment at the Sun and perform direct solar viewing without any harm to their eyes whatsoever, is a very difficult challenge. We will nevertheless make the attempt, because correct information and education is always the best course of action to follow in undertaking an exploration of any adventure in life. A total eclipse is one of those adventures, and so we will continue to attempt to combat misinformation with facts.


IT IS NEVER SAFE TO LOOK AT THE SUN WITHOUT PROTECTION AT ANY TIME WHEN ANY PART OF ITS BRIGHT DISK IS VISIBLE.


The responsibility for following all safety precautions in using any suitable solar viewing equipment or methods, and in following proven safe viewing practices, lies solely with the person who owns the eyes that are viewing the eclipse! Here is a link to a site that discusses eye safety, and all of its recommendations should be followed.  And here is an excellent piece (reproduced with permission) written by Dr. Ralph Chou, a professor of Optometry, veteran eclipse observer, and a world-renowned authority on solar filter certifications.  But it is important to recognize and acknowledge that you alone are responsible for the safety of your eyes. You alone are responsible for 1) determining the suitability for use, 2) obtaining sufficient training to achieve mastery in use, and 3) proper actual use of any and all equipment employed for the preservation of your eyesight.

The ONLY safe time to look at an eclipse with the naked eye is during the TOTAL phase of a TOTAL eclipse. And even then, you must ALWAYS use eye protection any time any piece of the Sun's bright disk is visible. It is NEVER safe to look at the partial phases of an eclipse without proper protection. Seeing a total eclipse can in fact be done quite safely with proper eye protection. But if you choose to stare at the Sun, outside of the window of time that it is being covered completely by the moon, and/or without proper equipment and techniques to ensure your safety, then you will likely do damage to your eyes. So don't do that.


IT IS OK TO WATCH A TOTAL ECLIPSE - BUT ONLY IF YOU DO IT SAFELY!


Scaremongering does take place, such as it did in Australia for both the 1976 and 2012 eclipses. In the end, many people who would otherwise have enjoyed the experience of a lifetime were frightened by "official" warnings to stay as far away from the eclipse as possible. Of course, the people who DID view the eclipse safely could do nothing but scratch their heads. See this page about Australian scare tactics used against viewing the 1976 total eclipse, hosted by Glenn Schneider. (Glenn is an astronomer, and veteran of 33 total eclipses. He has spent more time watching the Sun during totality than most humans ever will, and he is NOT blind!)

Simply follow the advice given in the AAS links above, and you will have a great, SAFE experience.

The only way to safely look at the Sun when it is not in total eclipse is through approved filter material designed and marketed expressly for direct solar viewing. If you do not have such material (which is inexpensive and readily available, through astronomical supply houses and right here at eclipse2017.org), then the only safe way for you to observe the partial phases of the eclipse is by using indirect methods such as projection.

Go to the Instructions.

The content of this site is informational in nature, has been tested and found to be accurate in actual use on numerous occasions, and is sufficient to ensure complete safety when suggested practices are strictly followed. However, no one can or should take responsibility for your actions, or your safety, except you.

You must agree with the above statements in their entirety, you must read and comply with the Terms and Conditions for use of the Solar Viewers, and you must agree to hold harmless Eclipse2017.org, inc., the authors of this site, and of all sites linked to by it, for any and all damage caused by your actions or inactions, to your person or the person of those under your guardianship, in order to use the information contained on said sites for any purpose.


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